American Pain Society Issues New Guidance on Medical Marijuana

A marijuana leaf is displayed at Canna Pi medical marijuana dispensary in Seattle, Washington, November 27, 2012. Picture taken November 27, 2012.  REUTERS/Anthony Bolante

The strongest evidence in terms of the therapeutic benefits from herbal cannabis, specifically cannabinoids, suggests analgesic effects, with a lengthy list of other possible benefits, including anticonvulsant activity, relief of anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, migraine relief, and inflammatory bowel disease.

“The problem is that most of the benefits are simply not well studied, with the exception of FDA [US Food and Drug Administration] indications for antiemetic and antinausea properties associated with chemotherapy and for wasting associated with HIV,” Dr Savage said.

Read more at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/863396#vp_1

Mary Nichols: Our Founding Patient

In 2008, Mary Nichols was working to change her life. Through diet and exercise, she lost nearly 70 pounds and was fit enough to walk 3 miles every day.

The problem was that Mary was also in severe pain. She spent most nights awake in the recliner playing games online as a distraction from the severe nerve pain that made it impossible to lie down and sleep.

Mary went through all of the protocols for conservative treatment for low back pain.

An MRI showed nothing that really explained the severe, searing pain Mary experienced on a daily basis. Just a few bulging disks. Nothing to worry about. But the pain didn’t go away.

Eventually, doctors at a local pain clinic in Charleston, WV convinced Mary that a spinal cord neuro-stimulator was the only option that was left. 

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An MRI showed nothing that really explained the severe, searing pain Mary experienced on a daily basis. Just a few bulging disks. Nothing to worry about. But the pain didn’t go away.

Continue reading “Mary Nichols: Our Founding Patient”